Phrasal frustration

If you are learning English, phrasal verbs might feel like a gigantic mountain set before you to challenge you at the best (and worst) of times. Many English students often feel defeated and frustrated, because finding a technique to learn these “silly little buggers”:bug:can be quite challenging.:see_no_evil:

:question:Question(s) of the day:

:one:“WHAT ON EARTH ARE PHRASAL VERBS?”

Let’s have a quick look…

:two:“HOW ON EARTH DO I USE THEM?”

:three:“HOW ON EARTH CAN I LEARN (AND REMEMBER) THEM?”

Here are some useful tips: :star_struck:

  1. Don’t group them by verb, but rather by particle (up, off, out, etc.)
    Instead of grouping phrasal verbs according to their verb (get up, get out, get off, get back),
    rather aim at grouping them by their particle (adverb/preposition).
    (sell out, go out, went out, etc.)

  2. Group them by topic
    Create a phrasal verb list by organizing them according to topic. Which phrasal verbs could
    you use when expressing emotions or describing people? By grouping them together, one can
    spot the various options available for use, without the risk of getting confused.

  3. Learn them in context.
    There is no point in learning a list of phrasal verbs if you don’t understand their use. Once you’ve
    learnt a new phrasal verb, search for it on Google, listen for it in movies, and try making your
    own sentences.

  4. Challenge yourself by using them in a story
    The next time you are with friends (or in a live lesson), try using your newly learnt phrasal verb in a story. Not confident enough? Try writing it down.

  5. Remember to breathe! You’ve got this! :blush: :+1:t2:

Let’s turn your “PHRASAL FRUSTRATION” into a “PHRASAL VACATION”! :crazy_face: :desert_island:

12 Likes

Great explanation, thanks @ChereeKr! Actually, phrasal verbs in English are not that different from split verbs in German :wink:

These tips are awesome, :hugs: Thank you @ChereeKr !

Haha, remember to breath! Thanks Cheree :slight_smile: