What do you find hard about learning French?

Bonjour !

I know learning French is everything but a piece of cake :cake:. And to be honest, if you ask French speaking people if they find their mother tongue easy, they’ll probably say ‘no’. :no_good_woman:

Just take the subjunctive, irregular verbs, conjugation, preposition, pronunciation, listening… All of those are obstacles to a smooth learning.

I’m curious to know, what do you personally find hard about learning French?

3 Likes

To be honest, I think one of the hardest parts of learning French is the spelling. It’s just as ridiculous as English :smiley: I really struggle with the silent letters (how is an x silent?!) and remembering to add an s for plurals. Then there’s all the contractions like qu’, t’, c’, and weird hyphenated things like est-ce and puis-je… and then there’s usually no difference in pronunciation. wtf.
Why can’t we spell everything the way it’s said? :weary:

6 Likes

For me, the hardest part is listening! It’s like there’s no connection between what’s written and what people say. :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes:

6 Likes

For me it’s when I tell people I’m learning French and they are like “Oh, you speak Spanish, so that should be easy for you”. :roll_eyes::unamused:

5 Likes

I second that, @antomorr :scream:

3 Likes

Not sure if you are actually asking the reason, but I found this question interesting and this is what I found:

English and French have this in common: both languages emerged early as literary standards and the “old” orthography was early on preferred because of habit. In English, the pronunciation changes mostly influenced the vowels (“the Great Vowel Shift”) and that’s why mostly vowels are now somehow unpredictable. In French, people started shortening words by not pronouncing the final consonants. The Académie Française made reforms in the 18th century and some of them silent consonants were deleted. But in a lot of cases, these endings still play some type of (morphological/syntactical) role:
like for example in “liaison”, the gender agreement in feminine adjectives (“froid” vs. “froide”) or derivation (the adding of suffixes makes these final consonant pronounceable again). Ex “respect” [rεs’pε] but “respectable” = [rεspεk’tabl].

6 Likes

For me it’s when trying to to connect sentences using the correct, ’ du, de, la, de la, des, un, une, or the complication of to have or to do. Etre, and avoir.

It’s a minefield.

5 Likes